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Extramural Funding Opportunities in EDI Research

The Vice President for Research Office has collected a list of extramural funding opportunities as part of our on-going commitment to support equitable, diverse, and inclusive research on our campus and in our broader communities. All available opportunities are published HERE, and will be updated bi-monthly. Please check each sponsor's solicitation for the most up-to-date information for each program, as the sponsor can change the details of the opportunity without notification.

If you are considering applying for an EDI-related funding opportunity and would like grant development support, please contact Mercedes Ward, Grant Development Specialist for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion.


William T. Grant Foundation Research Grants on Reducing Inequality (Major Research Grants)

Amount: typically range between $100,000 and $600,000
LOI Deadline: January 12, 2022

The Foundation’s mission is to support research to improve the lives of young people ages 5-25 in the United States. One way that we pursue this mission is by investing in high-quality field-initiated studies on reducing inequality in youth outcomes. Our focus on reducing inequality grew out of our view that research can do more than help us understand the problem of inequality—it can generate effective responses. We believe that it is time to build stronger bodies of knowledge on how to reduce inequality in the United States and to move beyond the mounting research evidence about the scope, causes, and consequences of inequality. Toward this end, we seek studies that aim to build, test, or increase understanding of programs, policies, or practices to reduce inequality in the academic, social, behavioral, or economic outcomes of young people. We prioritize studies about reducing inequality on the basis of race, ethnicity, economic standing, language minority status, or immigrant origins. (For smaller grants, see William T. Grant Foundation’s Officers’ Research Grants.)


 William T. Grant Foundation Research Grants on Reducing Inequality (Officers’ Research Grants)

Amount: range between $5,000 and $50,000
LOI Deadline: January 12, 2022

The Foundation’s mission is to support research to improve the lives of young people ages 5-25 in the United States. One way that we pursue this mission is by investing in high-quality field-initiated studies on reducing inequality in youth outcomes. Our focus on reducing inequality grew out of our view that research can do more than help us understand the problem of inequality—it can generate effective responses. We believe that it is time to build stronger bodies of knowledge on how to reduce inequality in the United States and to move beyond the mounting research evidence about the scope, causes, and consequences of inequality. Toward this end, we seek studies that aim to build, test, or increase understanding of programs, policies, or practices to reduce inequality in the academic, social, behavioral, or economic outcomes of young people. We prioritize studies about reducing inequality on the basis of race, ethnicity, economic standing, language minority status, or immigrant origins. (For larger grants, see William T. Grant Foundation’s Major Research Grants.)


Economic Development Administration (EDA) ARPA Good Jobs Challenge NOFO

Amount: $25,000,000 (award ceiling; estimated total program funding $500,000,000)
Deadline: January 26, 2022

Through this American Rescue Plan Act Good Jobs Challenge Notice of Funding Opportunity (ARPA Good Jobs Challenge NOFO), EDA aims to assist communities and regions impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. The pandemic has caused, and continues to cause, economic injury to U.S. communities and regions in devastating and unprecedented ways. This ARPA GoodJobs Challenge NOFO is designed to help get Americans back to work by developing and strengthening regional systems to develop and execute sectoral partnerships that will lead to well-paying jobs. The goal of regional workforce training systems is to create and implement effective employer-driven training programs that will connect the existing and emerging skills needs of employers with workers and will help workers find and keep quality jobs and advance along their chosen career path. Regional workforce training systems and sectoral partnerships funded under this NOFO should connect employers in an industry with key regional stakeholders, including state and local governmental entities, economic development organizations, workforce development boards, employer-facing organizations, education and training providers, community‑based organizations (CBOs), worker-serving organizations (WSOs), and/or labor unions. The system or partnership should be led by a System Lead Entity or Backbone Organization, respectively, serving as an intermediary that has convening power in the region and the capacity to coordinate all necessary stakeholders. EDA also encourages systems and partnerships to address populations with labor market barriers such as persons with disabilities, at-risk youth, individuals in recovery, individuals with past criminal records including justice‑impacted and reentry participants, and veterans.


NIH Measures and Methods to Advance Research on Minority Health and Health Disparities-Related Constructs (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Amount: $500,000 direct costs annually
Deadline: February 5, 2022

This initiative will support research to improve the measures and methods for complex social constructs that capture the lived experience of populations that experience health disparities. The NIH-designated U.S. populations with health disparities are racial and ethnic minority groups, sexual and gender minority groups, underserved rural populations, and socioeconomically disadvantaged populations of any race or ethnicity.


NIH Addressing Health Disparities among Immigrant Populations through Effective Interventions (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

Amount: according to scope
Deadline: February 5, 2022; June 5, 2022; October 5, 2022 (Standard Dates)

The purpose of the Immigrant health initiative is to support research to design and implement effective interventions to enhance health advantages and reduce health disparities among U.S. immigrant populations (particularly migrant workers, recent and 1st generation immigrants) and address factors related to immigration experiences that affect health. For the purposes of this funding announcement, the term "1st generation" refers to people who were born in their native country and relocated to the U.S. The term "2nd generation" refers to the U.S. born children of 1st generation immigrants.


NIH Addressing the Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages Among Immigrant Populations (R01 Clinical trial not allowed)

Amount: according to scope
Deadline: February 5, 2022; June 5, 2022; October 5, 2022 (Standard Dates)

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support innovative research to understand factors uniquely associated with the immigration experience that contribute to health disparities or health advantages among U.S. immigrant populations. This includes but is not limited to risk/protective factors associated with immigration processes from influences that push migration from the sending country, through the experience of immigration, to the experience of resettlement, short and long term residence in the U.S. and the process of acculturation that affect the health of U.S. immigrant populations (particularly migrant workers, recent and 1st generation immigrants). For the purposes of this funding announcement, the term "1st generation" refers to people who were born in their native country and relocated to the U.S. The term "2nd generation" refers to the U.S. born children of 1st generation immigrants.


 NIH Patient-Clinician Relationship: Improving Health Outcomes in Populations that Experience Health Care Disparities (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)

Amount: according to scope
Deadline: February 5, 2022; June 5, 2022; October 5, 2022 (Standard Dates)

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support innovative multi-disciplinary and multi-level (e.g., patient, clinician, interpersonal, health care system, community) research designed to understand how optimizing patient-clinician communication and relationship affects health care outcomes in patients from populations with health care disparities. In addition, this initiative will support research to (1) gain an understanding of how the Patient-Clinician Relationship (PCR) in the primary care and chronic disease care settings affects clinical and non-clinical health outcomes in populations that experience health disparities, and (2) identify best practices and interventions that build and improve PCR leading to better health outcomes and increased health equity.


NSF Partnerships in Astronomy & Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)

Amount: anticipated funding amount is $3,000,000 (estimated number of awards 5-10)
Deadline: February 7, 2022

The objective of PAARE is to improve the quality and environment of astronomy and astrophysics research and education by stimulating the development of formal, long-term partnerships that provide authentic pathways into the research enterprise and broaden the participation of individuals from groups underrepresented in astronomy. Partnerships must substantially involve institutions seeking to create opportunities for student and faculty research that will increase the recruitment, retention, and success of these individuals. It is expected that the partnerships will build or strengthen research capacity, as well as foster a diverse, inclusive, and equitable environment for astronomy and astrophysics research and education at the partnering institutions.


NIH HEAL Initiative: Preventing Opioid Misuse and Co-Occurring Conditions by Intervening on Social Determinants (R01 Clinical Trials Optional)

Amount: according to scope
Deadline: March 2, 2022

In April 2018, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched the Helping to End Addiction Long-termSMInitiative or HEAL InitiativeSM, an aggressive, trans-agency effort to speed scientific solutions to stem the national opioid public health crisis. Through this initiative the National Institute on Drug Abuse, in partnership with other NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices, requests applications for studies designed to develop and test multi-level interventions to prevent opioid misuse, opioid use disorder, and co-occurring conditions by intervening on social determinants of health (SDOH).This initiative aims to build an evidence base for multi-level interventions that target malleable factors and conditions affecting the social context. Applications must seek to reduce health inequities in a U.S. population or population subgroup affected by the opioid crisis by studying the effects of a theory driven, multi-level intervention on the prevention of opioid misuse/opioid use disorder and co-occurring conditions. Such conditions could include mental health conditions and/or suicide, and may also include other substance use and substance use-related outcomes. The research project must examine the mechanisms by which the interventions exert their effects, and conduct economic analyses to inform decisions about adoption of strategies. Investigators should study interventions that are  sustainable and easily taken to scale if effective.


NIH Understanding Place-Based Health Inequalities in Mid-Life (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)

Amount: $400,000 per year in direct costs
Deadline: March 3, 2022

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support research that uncovers potential modifiable explanations about how “places” (e.g., countries, US Census regions, states, counties, neighborhoods, and locations across the urban-rural continuum) are related to morbidity and mortality among middle-aged adults in order to inform policy responses to address poor mid-life health and health disparities. Specifically, this FOA will support studies that: 1) clarify social, economic, behavioral, and institutional explanations for place-based health disparities (levels and trends), 2) examine intersections between place and sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity) to better understand and address processes driving other health disparities, and/or 3) include data collection and data enhancements to support 1 and 2.

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Last Updated: 12/7/21